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alwaysakid

M –59
Burnsville, Minnesota
United States

 
 

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Watch Out For The Plows

By alwaysakid

OK, I admit it, I'm a dummy. The weather forecasters and news outlets warned us a winter storm was coming. But they said it would be 5-7 inches of snow and I figured I could shovel that, never mind that I hurt my back in the last storm slipping on ice.
Well, we got 10-12 inches, and the '61 T-Bird was blocking the path of the snow blower, which had no gas anyway. I should've moved the T-Bird and got gas yesterday, when they were warning us of the impending storm, but I didn't.
After about 45 minutes of shoveling and having barely put a dent into the accumulation, my back was starting to hurt. So, I swallowed my pride, and asked our friend who is staying with us and has 4-wheel-drive to go out through our unplowed driveway and get some gas for the snowblower. Our friend Mary took the gas can and saved the day.
So, I'm out clearing snow, and figuring the plow had already been by our street and was done there, went to work on clearing the snow birm it left in my driveway. But while in the midst of that, I turned around and there was the snow plow again, stopped just short of my driveway, waiting for me to get out of his way (I didn't hear him coming over the snow blower as he may be bigger but I make more noise). I looked at all that snow in front of his plow about to be deposited in my driveway, and then I looked at the driver. He had a big smile on his face. Determined, I stood my ground. This is my driveway, and I am not going to let him pile a bunch more snow in it. I tightly grabbed both handles of my snow blower and revved the engine, attempting to stare down that big, five-ton, plow-equipped dump truck. And you know what? He lifted his blade and drove around me, still smiling. I put my finger to the side of my nose and gave a nod of my head (oh, wait, that's that other seasonal story), and we both went about clearing mother nature's blanket for the free movement of the community's cars.
Merry Christmas to all, and to all, a clear driveway!

Did Anybody Miss Me?

By alwaysakid

I've been gone for several weeks, working out of town and then moving out of town. My job got transfered to Minneapolis, so after living out of a hotel for a few weeks, I moved from the Sioux Falls area to the Twin Cities area. After the move, it took almost two weeks to establish internet service, so I've been away from Motortopia for most of about four or five weeks (I did use the hotel computer a couple times for a quick peek at Motortopia). But I'm in my new house in Burnsville, MN, now, and the Internet is up and running. The new house has TWO two-car garages, while the old one had only one three-car garage. In my book, that's a nice step up. Who cares what the rest of the house is like.
Since the company moved my job and liked me well enough to want to keep me, they offered to move my stuff, including two of my cars. So, I had the '61 T-Bird and '50 Studebaker shipped. But since the company was paying, they picked the mode of transport -- an open trailer. That had me a little worried, since we were moving in November. But God is good, although he also has a sense of humor. The Sunday before the move, we got almost 10 inches of snow in the Minneapolis area. I admit it, I was worried. But then things cleared up and we had excellent weather for the move. The cars arrived dry and clean. The following weekend, it snowed again, but by then the cars were tucked away in their new garage.
Now to wait until spring to find out what the Twin Cities, and specifically Burnsville, offer in a cruising scene within the limitations of my work schedule.

Automated Tolls Blues

By alwaysakid

So, a couple weeks ago I drive to Upstate New York to see my son. As I go through Indiana, I find the toll booths are devoid of humans -- they've been automated. Starting out, it's not so bad, you just take your ticket, like so many pay parking lots. But then I get to where I have to pay the money. I'm sitting behind a car, wondering what's taking him so long, and finally it's my turn. I'm about to learn what took that guy so long. I insert my ticket in the clearly marked slot, but it spits it out. I try again, and it spits it out again. The third time I quit being gentle and shove the ticket as deeply in the slot as I can. Then the price I'm supposed to pay, along with the number of axles I'm being charged with, comes up. What!?! $48 for seven axles?! I'm driving a little Mazda for crying out loud. So I push the button for help and I get a recording telling me all the agents are busy and I will receive assistance when my turn in the que comes up. Meanwhile, I glance in my rearview mirror and notice cars are starting to back up behind me. Finally someone answers and when I tell him the problem he quickly corrects it to the propper $4 toll (apparently he's gotten used to having to fix these problems). So, I start pushing dollar bills in the slot. The first one is rejected, so I try another one. The second one goes in, but the third, fourth and fifth are rejected. After going through a dozen singles, I start asking my passengers for dollar bills, and pretty soon I have rejected dollar bills lying all over my lap and the floor of the car until we finally find four bills good enough for this machine. The gate goes up -- apparently it's the only part of that contraption working properly. If any of you live in Indiana, call your transportation department and tell them to put their employees back in the toll booths or they're going to have to hire more people to help all the poor motorists that can't get off the toll road, not to mention the traffic cops to deal with the jams at the toll exits. This automated system is so bad, that when I got to the next toll booth in Ohio and saw a human there as I pulled up, I said to her with longing eyes, "I love you." And she knew exactly what I meant.

It's Gone

By alwaysakid

Filed under: /blogs/browse/t/vehicle/v//p

I sold Not-So-Big-Foot last week. It was kind of a fun vehicle to drive in that it definately made the operator feel like a truck driver. And it was convenient to have a pickup truck available. But I just didn't use it much, and it often sat for a couple months without turning a wheel.
But the main motivator is that I'm getting transferred soon to Minneapolis by my employer and thought it would be convenient to have one less vehicle to drive there. Part of the relocation package is they'll ship up to 2 vehicles, but I'll be taking advantage of that even without the truck. In fact, when the relocation person was explaining the benefits available, she said she was sure nobody would use that feature because each family member can drive their own vehicle. I raised my hand and said I'd be using it. When she asked why, I said I have 5 vehicles and only 2 drivers, and she then not only rolled her eyeballs, but her entire head with them. Obviously, she's not a motorhead.
Anyway, friends at church were lamenting that their son lost his vehicle and couldn't afford another one and didn't know what to do. I offered the truck and a deal was struck. Their son loves it.

I'm The Rebel Now

By alwaysakid

Filed under: /blogs/browse/t/vehicle/v//p

James Dean and Marlon Brando, step aside. There's a new rebel without a cause in town.
That's right, I think I'm a rebel. I'm the guy that people look at funny, and wonder what he could be thinking.
What makes me such a rebel? Well, just look at most of the cars on Motortopia, or at the local car shows, and then look at what I'm driving.
In this current time, everyone wants to have the fast car. Muscle cars are back on the new car lots, and those who don't have them are hotrodding what they've got. Even the old cars, they're not left stock anymore. They have to have custom touches (preferably to make it look fast) and powerful, fast engines. The pipes must rumble and the wheels gotta be chrome.
Then I come around the corner in my 1950 Studebaker. No wheel flares or frenched headlights, just what the factory gave it. The pipe (yep, there's only one) is quiet and raising the hood reveals only six cylinders. No turbo charger and only one carburator on this stock, flathead six! 0-60 is measured in miles, not minutes.
Everybody else has their hotrods, streetrods, muscle cars and sports touring cars. But not me. I'm in a genuine, stock, antique car that drives just like it did 60 years ago.
What an unusual person I must be; what a nonconformist; what a rebel!

Do Not Judge Lest You Be Judged

By alwaysakid

I've been reading a few blogs posted about inaccurate judging at various car shows, so I thought I'd throw in my two-cents worth.
I've been to three "judged" events this year, two with the Studebaker and one with the T-Bird. The one with the T-Bird I didn't even stay to see who won because the show ran for 7 hours (too long), had only one trophy to award, and I would've been disappointed if I had won it because of the caliber of several of the other entries.
As for the two events I attended with my Studebaker, the results really raised my eyebrows.
At one show, the Studebaker was entered in an "orphans" category for obvious reasons. But the car that won was a Chrysler! That's right, a Chrysler in the "orphans" category, apparently because it was a Crossfire and Chrysler doesn't make Crossfires anymore. I guess, based on that definition, 75 percent of the cars in the show should've been in that category, but the owner of the car gets to choose the category in which his or her car is to be judged. And I suspect the owner of the Crossfire knew there wouldn't be much competition in the "orphans" category (wait until all the Plymouth, Pontiac and Oldsmobile owners figure that out), and he wanted his trophy.
At the other judged show in which I took my Studebaker, I knew I was in trouble when a friend of mine came up to me and announced he was chosen to judge the Studebaker class. He's a diehard hotrodder, and there's no way he would ever choose a stock six-cylinder car to win anything. Sure enough, he chose the Hawk with the blower sticking through the hood (personally, I think the original '63 Avanti should've won, but that's beside the point). When he came up to me to announce he had been chosen to be a judge, he told me he would probably choose that Hawk before seeing all the Studebakers, and I never even saw him get closer than 30 feet to my car to determine his decision.
Am I mad at my friend? Heck, no! That's because I understand him. I know he is a hotrodder through-and-through. I think even if he had some kind of super car, he'd still be looking for a way to tweak it and get some part of the engine to stick thorugh the hood. That's his way and how he enjoys cars. And he's a nice guy.
The way I figure it, he's volunteering his time so he should be able to choose whatever car he wants to be the winner. If I don't like it, I should volunteer to be a judge next year (which I probably won't because I seldom get to the same show two years in a row). Likewise, the other guy (and I don't know who he was) that chose a Chrysler as the best "orphan," well, that's his perogative since he agreed to take the time to judge the cars at that show,
I came away from the show where my friend helped judge without any plastic statues, but I had an excellent time. I saw a lot of great cars, trucks and motorcycles, and enjoyed visiting with several car and biker friends I ran into there. And I've been able to prolong my pleasure by posting pictures of that show on Motortopia and read and discuss comments with my Motortopia friends.
One of the things they did at the one show which I thought was an excellent idea, was instead of awarding second and third place awards, they chose some of the better cars that didn't win to receive "Outstanding In Class" awards (I did get one of those). I thought that was an excellent idea as it gives the car owner some prestige without having to be the first or second loser.
I recognize the importance of scoring points to help determine the historical accuracy of antique cars. But most shows are not judged by "historians;" they're judged by average guys not much different from me, and we're going to have some limits to our historical knowledge. And how do you score points on a car that's been customized or hotrodded? That's going to be almost purely subjective.
So, I guess the moral of my story is don't get too caught up in the judging and trophy thing. It's more important to enjoy yourself. If it's the judging part you enjoy most, then start contacting some car show organizers and offer yourself as a judge. Most of these events are always needing more help. But be aware, as my friend said, whenever you're a judge, you're going to probably make somebody mad. That's because a lot of people get caught up in the judging and trophy thing.

The T-Bird Takes One For The Mazda

By alwaysakid

Filed under: /blogs/browse/t/vehicle/v//p

I wanted to call Mother Nature mother-something-else!
We had severe storms come through our area Saturday evening with some very strong winds that caved in our garage door. The Mazda was unscathed, but that's because the '61 Thunderbird next to it was a much longer car and served as a block for the Mazda, stopping the garage door from caving in any further.
But the T-Bird held up very well. The only damage is a slight, barely negligible dent by the taillight. It appears when the garage door hit the bumper, it was stopped from going any further. Other garage doors in the neighborhood, all on houses facing west like ours, were punched in much farther than ours.
And two large trees behind us were uprooted and knocked over.
The cost of replacing the garage door will be less than our deductible, so I'm doing some customizing to the budget. But the T-Bird has good, full coverage, so I don't anticipate that to be much of a problem. It's just a question of whether the dent can be knocked out of the original bumper.
Or since it is the original bumper with the original chrome still good and the dent is barely noticeable, maybe I should just leave it alone.

Wrong Kind of Cruise

By alwaysakid

I wasn’t real enthused about the idea of a cruise trip. To me, cruising is supposed to be done in a car, not on a ship! And the idea of a top speed of 20 MPH seemed ludicrous, although when we got into heavy seas I was glad they didn’t try to go that fast.
But this cruise was going to Alaska, and I’d seen pictures of the beautiful scenery there. That did interest me. Well, the wife, son and daughter-in-law really wanted to go on the Alaska cruise, so I reluctantly agreed to leave my car behind and climb aboard.
By the end of the second day, I was beginning to show signs of withdrawal symptoms. I hadn’t seen a car in two days. The round life preservers on the ship were beginning to look like wide-white-wall tires to me. As we got closer to shore, having entered the Inside Passage, the scenery was beautiful, everything I expected of Alaska and more. But I strained to see the one thing that was missing. There were no roads. No wonder so many people take these cruises, you can’t get to these shores by car because there are no roads! Sure enough, as we arrived the first port, Juneau, we were advised that even though this is Alaska’s capital, there are no roads into this city. The only way in and out is by boat, ship or seaplane. Not even Sarah Palin can drive to the state capital!
But as we got closer, I thought I saw a cut in the trees. It looked like a road. Yes, there it was, a four-wheeled vehicle, some kind of SUV, traveling along the way on the outskirts of the town. Not even Juneau is so backward as to have no cars for getting around. In fact, as we disembarked to look around the town, there were a lot of cars there. Almost enough to make a traffic jam. And they had more than one traffic light, too!
Then it happened. I thought I caught a glimpse of the rear of a red 1966 Chevy Nova. I could hear the rumbling of a high-output engine that could be a hotrod or a redneck’s modified 4x4 pickup. I ran to the other end of the park, and there it was, turning down a street. It was a ’66 Nova! I wanted to get a picture of that, nevermind the surrounding mountains or the stuffed grizzly bear in front of the gift shop!
So, I spent much of the day reenacting Kurt’s frustrations in American Graffiti – trying to catch a cool old car cruising around, but always just missing it after brief glimpses. Granted, it was a Chevy Nova, not a Ford T-Bird, and I never even got to see if it was driven by a voluptuous future Hollywood star (not that I care since I’m married, in case my wife reads this). But I shared Kurt’s frustrations, because it was the only car in the entire town I cared about and I couldn’t even get a picture of it. I thought about looking for a local radio station to see if I could make a special request over the airwaves, since that worked for Kurt, sort of, but then it was time to return to the cruise ship. And so, I left Juneau, never to see that red Nova again.
But the story doesn’t end here on such a sad note. Because the next stop was Skagway, which actually had a road in and out, even if it was only open half the year. Nonetheless, it probably had less vehicles than Juneau. But it had hotrods. And you could ride them.
There they were, as I got off the ship. A 1927 Mack bus! And shortly afterwards a second one drove up, and it was driven by a young, attractive blonde (not that I noticed)! Yes, I did say hotrods. These were no ordinary antique buses. They were powered by Chevy 350 V-8s, which kind of makes them hotrods. If you were as desperate as I was at the time for something automotive that was interesting, these were hotrods.
Also parked nearby, waiting to greet me as I came off the ship, was a 1966 Ford Falcon. It was in pretty rough shape, but it was an old car and I liked it, almost enough to take a picture of it in spite of the severe rust and miscolored doors.
And they had trains in Skagway, including one powered by an old steam engine. I like seeing old trains, so this helped divert my attention from the limited number of cars in the area.
I liked Skagway.
It was a long two days at sea again before we made it to the next port, Victoria, B.C., which had several roads in and out and lots of cars around. And some of the local owners of antique cars knew how to get the most out of their investments. There waiting at port for the tourists were an old English Austin taxi cab, a 1954 Ford convertible and two mid-1960s Pontiac convertibles, each offering tours of the town for the small fee of $190. But it cost me nothing to photograph them. Ah, things are starting to get back to normal a little bit.
The next day we were back in Seattle, where it was raining again. We got up early in the morning to catch a flight to Minneapolis and drive home 4 ½ hours from there. But we made it home in time to catch the Saturday night cruise. I was exhausted from all the traveling, but before we actually got home I stopped by the cruise to see who was out. I had seen most of the cars before, but they are some extremely good-looking cars and it was good to see them again.
Now I was ready to go home and end my vacation with a good night’s rest.

Fix Or Repair Daily

By alwaysakid

Filed under: /blogs/browse/t/vehicle/v//p

This old Ford F150 is frustrating me. I bought it for a winter vehicle, particularly to get around in bad snow storms, and it's proving to be a fair-weather vehicle. Lately, it's broken down every time I've tried to drive it in wet weather. It starts up fine, but as it's going down the road, it just dies. It restarts, but after a little ways dies again. I can see the tach, while I'm cruising at a constant speed, just drop to zero (and feel the loss of power). When I restart it, it backfires from the unburnt fuel, so I'm pretty sure it's a wiring problem. So far, I've replaced the spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, rotor, fuel pump relay wiring, starter selenoid, the alternator, fuel filter; and I've put fuel cleaner in the tank several times. But as long as the roads are dry and the sun is shining, it runs fine. As you might imagine, I'm getting tired of throwing parts at it. I tried idling it at night with the hood up, but couldn't see any arcing.
Any suggestions out there?

White Christmas

By alwaysakid

Filed under: /blogs/browse/t/vehicle/v//p

Did we ever have a white Christmas. For five days in a row, it snowed. The snow bank on one side of the driveway is getting so high, the snow blower can't blow the snow over it anymore. I have to blow most of the snow to the one side because the wind is always blowing and when I try to blow it on the other side, it just blows back in my face.
I made it into work Christmas Eve using the 4X4 truck, but wasn't sure if I'd get home. They ordered all trains to be parked that evening so the crews could have Christmas Day off, although a few local jobs had to work to serve customers that operate 365 days a year and need a switch every day. But they decided only one dispatcher needed to work Christmas Day each shift and the dispatcher with the lowest seniority would be the one to work, so I got Christmas Day off. But I almost had to spend it in a motel room. I finally got to where all of the trains I was handling were parked at 6:15 p.m., and shortly before that they announced that the interstate highways would be closed at 7 p.m. I told the people at work that either I would have to leave right then or I wouldn't get home, so it was agreed that I would go and another dispatcher would handle anything that might come up on my desk. As I was getting off I-29 on the way home, I saw state workers putting up the barricades on the I-29 ramps.
We stayed home all day Christmas. I waited until the end of the day Christmas to even try to dig out because it was snowing and blowing so hard. It was still snowing pretty good, but the winds were calm so it seemed a good time. Apparently during the night the winds kicked back up, because when we got up in the morning, we were snowed in again with more big drifts. I got the snow blower out and got most of the driveway done again when the snowblower ran out of gas. I had gone a whole winter last year without having to refill the snowblower's gas tank, and I had filled the tank just before this storm hit. Well, the driveway was cleared enough to get out, so I threw the gas can in the truck and figured I'd stop for gas on the way home from work. When I got out of work, the truck wouldn't start. Tried jumping it with a co-worker's truck and still nothing. The headlights were bright, indicating it wasn't the battery. Finally it just started. But I wasn't going to risk stopping on the way home and getting stranded, so no gas for the snowblower. When I got home, the driveway was full of snow again, with just a space open to pull the truck in, in front of the garage. Well, I didn't want to park it on the street while I dug out again, because if it didn't start, they'd tow it away for the plows, so I pulled in, and sure enough, the next time I tried to start it, nothing. So, now I had all of my vehicles blocked by a broke-down truck and no gas to blow out the rest of the driveway. I had to dig it out with a shovel to make a way to get my other car out, then drive down to the gas station to get gas for the snowblower to finish the job. Now I have to figure out how to get the truck to the shop; it probably needs a new starter, and I'm not going to climb under it in the cold and snow to do it myself.
Didn't make it to church yesterday (a rarity for us). Spent much of the morning digging out --again!

Briefly a Fugitive

By alwaysakid

The police got me last weekend.
I was coming home from work, and upon turning off the Interstate ramp, I saw the county mounty parked in the empty parking lot. It took both hands, but I managed to keep my foot from pressing too much on the accelerator.
But he quickly pulled out behind me and came up close on my tail. Hah, I thought, he wants to presure me into speeding, but I'm not going to do it!
Then the lights came on. What do I do? Should I pull over or make a run for it. My home was less than two miles away, I could make it there before he got reinforcements. Then I could hole up and make a Randy Weaver-type stand.
My better judgement quickly took over and I pulled over. The officer wanted to tell me I had a burned out headlight. He probably also wanted to smell my breath and look inside my car for suspicious cellephane-wrapped packages of white powder, but I was okay there.
We're in the 21st century. Why am I getting pulled over for a burned out headlight? I still have the other headlight, my daytime running lights, parking lights, fog lamps; heck, I've got more lights on the front of my vehicle than a UFO!
The officer said he was just giving me a verbal warning, not to worry.
But it's the weekend, what happens if I don't get it fixed right away, I asked?
He said he wasn't concerned. He was sure I'd get it fixed once I got tired of being pulled over by police.
My burnt out headlight is repaired.

NEWS FLASH - Great Pumpkin Missing, Frosty Implicated

By alwaysakid

SIOUX FALLS, SD -- With only weeks until Halloween, The Great Pumpkin is missing and is presumed to have been run out of town. Frosty the Snowman is under police custody and is being called a "person of interest."
Many business are gearing up for the Halloween holiday, but business is slumping since children have discovered The Great Pumpkin has been run out of town. While rumors have The Great Pumpkin seen playing with seagulls in southern California or surfing in Florida, his actual location has not been verified. Pieces of a broken pumpkin found in a dark alley have been sent out for forensic analysis, but police say they have no evidence connecting this with The Great Pumpkin and they believe he is simply "out of town."
Police point to the evidence of unusually early snowfall on Oct. 9 in the Sioux Falls area, accumulating about an inch, and then again Oct. 12 with three more inches piling up. While they will not say Frosty The Snowman produced the snow, they said his presence during the phenomenon along with his known preference for such conditions make him an obvious "person of interest" in The Great Pumpkin's disappearance.
However, attorneys for Frosty are quick to point out that Santa Claus requires snowfall to travel in his sleigh, and his whereabouts during the alleged crime has not been accounted for.
The investigation continues.

Super Challenger

By alwaysakid

Maybe I missed something, but I haven't seen anything on Motortopia about Mr. Norm's Super Challenger. Famous for building high-horsepower muscle cars out of hot new cars in the late 1960s and early 1970s, Mr. Norm is back at it again, using the new 2009 Challenger. It has some of the retro looks of the old muscle cars, such as striping and such, but a lot more horsepower. I was wondering if anyone has looked into these deeper than myself, and if so, what are your thoughts?

Want To Support Orphans?

By alwaysakid

I started a new group, but have been kind of surprised at the lack of interest in it. I thought now would be a good time to start a group on orphan cars, since so many automotive divisions are falling by the wayside.
Of course, my main interest in starting Orphan Owners Group was because I recently purchased a Studebaker. But orphan car makers is no longer confined to Studebakers, Hudsons and Desotos. The orphanage is getting crowded with the likes of Oldsmobile, Plymouth and even Pontiac!
I thought we could have some good forums in this group on where some of these makes came from and what brought about their desmise, or maybe on some of the cars they made that just seem like they should have saved the day.
If you're interested in automotive makes that are falling by the wayside, come check out our group. Maybe you'll enjoy it.
We're at http://www.mo....com/group/OO or,
http://www.mo...rphans_owners
Or maybe there just isn't a lot of interest in these makes that have died off and that's why they died off. Hmmm.

Bought Another One

By alwaysakid

Well, I went and did it. I bought another car. The neighbors are probably looking up the number of the padded ambulance as you read this. Or the city ordinance on the number of vehicles allowed at a residence.
I always kind of wanted a Studebaker. And while I really wanted a Hawk, when I went to look at a '61 Hawk, the guy had this, too. The Hawk was in really bad shape, in that all he could say about it was the body was solid (never mind the smashed quarter-pannel) and it ran good (if you kept pouring oil in it every hour). And for just a couple more grand, I got into a restored 1950 Studebaker Champion. It seemed a no-brainer to me, especially since my wife and a friend living with us both fell in love with it based on pictures online.
The garage kind of had a hole in it anyway, since I left the '51 Chevy with my son in New York. What do I do if he returns the Chevy? Ah, well, I figure by then my wife will be so in love with the Studebaker, she'll give up her spot in the garage. Yeah, maybe I'm dreaming, but I don't think my son's going to let me have the Chevy back anyway.
So, I bought the Champion and drove it home about 450 miles during which it ran great. The sun visor that the previous owner had put on blew off, but the car seemed to handle better without it anyway. I don't think I'm going to put that back on.
It's no hotrod, with a flathead six for power. But it runs very smooth and quiet. It got about 19 miles per gallon, and is kind of like driving a luxury car, even though it was built more to compete with Chevrolet than with Buick.
But what I like about it most is the radical styling. In 1950 there was nothing like it on the road, nor has there been since (except maybe the 1951 Studebaker). It was definately over the top, which is probably why they went for a major restyle only 2 years later. But I think it looks great. It's very much like a piece of art.

Long Road Trip

By alwaysakid

Filed under: /blogs/browse/t/vehicle/v//p

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.
Such was the trip at the end of May as Brian Lee and his son drove Brian’s 1951 Chevy sedan delivery to Rochester, NY, where it currently resides.
First, some background – Ben had done most of the work of hotrodding the Chevy, installing the driveline from a 1974 Nova SS, including a 350 V-8, while he was in high school. So, Brian told him that if he graduated college without the need to sell the Chevy to help pay for tuition, he could buy the Chevy for the original price Brian paid to acquire the car out of a junk yard. Ben graduated from college three years ago, but hadn’t settled down until now. So he said now he wants to buy the Chevy.
Ben flew to Sioux Falls from Rochester, NY, and on May 26 He and Brian set out for Rochester, taking turns driving the Chevy and Brian’s Toyota (which used almost one-third of the gasoline the Chevy consumed). Grace rode along, but had no desire to do any of the driving.
It was fun driving the old Chevy down the highway and hearing the various comments at stops.
“Is that a Nomad?” In more than 15 years of ownership, that’s the first time it’s ever been mistaken for that!
The car performed flawlessly, always starting and running smooth. And while it was fun to drive, it was equally fun to watch from the other car. Man, that car looked good going down the highway.
Brian and Ben kept in contact with each other by using a set of walkie-talkies. Remember them? They still make them.
“GT to Heaven Bound, you gotcher ears on good buddy?”
“Ten-four, I gotcher back door, Little Blue.”
“Traffic’s getting thick, if we get separated, I’ll meetcha at the choke-and-puke at the next travel plaza.”
Ben turned to his mother and said, “The what?”
“The choke-and-puke! That’s what they called a restaurant on the movie Smokie and the Bandit.”
“Oh.”
But then there was the rain. It rained and rained, and we’re not talking spring showers. There were torrential downpours, that had even the best of drivers pulling over because they couldn’t see. The old Chevy, it still has vacuum-operated windshield wipers. So, during normal heavy rainfall, you could see while driving downhill, but not so well going up hills, when the acceleration used up the vacuum. And when the buckets came down, you couldn’t see from either car without slowing down dramatically.
“You still there, Heaven Bound?”
“I think so. I’m following a boat. It has trailer lights, but I can’t see the trailer. I think it’s just someone smart enough to use a boat to get down the highway.”
The skies were crying great floods, as Heaven Bound ran farther and farther away from South Dakota.
And then there was the weather-stripping -- or lack there-of. The Chevy always leaked when it rained hard. And as hard as it was raining on this trip, it leaked a lot. We had to hang our shoes, socks and even pants to dry when we spent the night in Indiana.
It’s just a hobby car, after all. When the weather was bad, it usually didn’t go out, so the vacuum windshield wipers and poor weather stripping had never been an issue before. And during the two-day drive to Rochester, NY, the car probably saw more rain than it had in the entire 17 years Brian has owned it.
But as they reached the New York state line, the rain subsided, for the most part. And upon arriving at Ben’s home, everything was rosy. The old car had made it.
Five days later, Brian left New York to return home – without the 1951 Chevy. All was not so rosy for him.
And again, the sky was crying.
So, who is the owner of Heaven Bound now? If you ask Ben, he is. His wife pointed out they have the car now, and possession is nine-tenths of the law. However, I still have the title to it, and if you ask any bank, possession of the TITLE is nine-tenths of the law when it comes to owning cars. He can enjoy it for a while, and we'll see how serious he is about this old car hobby. Maybe he'll buy it, and a family heirloom will be passed on. Or maybe he'll tire of it and find he doesn't have the time for it, upon which we'll have another long road trip (hopefully with better weather then).

To Buy or Not To Buy

By alwaysakid

A friend of mine is selling this 1996 Saturn SC2. It's a nice looking car, runs really well, and the price is attractive. I was considering buying it myself. But my "wants" list doesn't even have a Saturn of any model on it. Still, I could probably have the few repairs it needs done at the local garage (eliminatng any sweat equity) and still have less in it than the Kelly blue book value. Then I could drive it for a couple years and maybe sell it then to get my investment back. But could a Saturn really be an "investment?" And do I really need another car that would probably serve as a daily driver? How many daily drivers can a person have before they can no longer be daily drivers because none are drive daily (My wife and I currently have 3)? I was considering adding another car to the stable, but I was looking for something much older. I'm not sure I need another "collector car" either. Maybe I'll get lucky and someone will buy this Saturn before I make up my mind. Then I won't have to make up my mind -- at least until I find another car for sale that I really like.

Easter Car Show

By alwaysakid

Based on the number of cars at the Easter Car Show, the garage was empty this weekend for a lot of cool car owners in the Sioux Falls area. Although the car show was indoors, the weather was great, bringing out a number of additional cars unplanned for the event.
But of course, a garage being empty isn't as near a big deal as a tomb being empty. The car show was a lot of fun, but nowhere near as exciting as some dude rising from his grave. That's why we really celebrate Easter. It's all about Jesus' resurrection. The car show was just a little extra icing on the cake.

I've Been Published!

By alwaysakid

I have published my first book! I'm rather excited about it, and of course, it's about cars. Don't be too impressed, though, because I went through a self-publishing company in which I had to pay all the initial costs up front to make it happen. Still, my first review (on Amazon.com) was a very good one. If you like the photos I've posted in albums in my garage, you'll like this book, "For The Love of Cars." Many of those photos are featured in this book in addition to others that have never been posted online. Also, it details my observations of how the old car hobby has grown in the 30 years I've been involved in it. If you're interested, the book retails for $28.99 and can be purchased online at Amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com or authorhouse.com or you can contact me to arrange to purchase a copy. Who knows, maybe this will launch me into a career as a world-famous, best-seller author. Or maybe not.

What's he thinking?

By alwaysakid

I thought maybe we could have a little fun with this picture. What's going through this little boy's mind?
"Is there a hemi in there?"
"This must dispense something."
"The sign said 'Do not touch,' but I don't see anything in there that I shouldn't touch."
"Hey Dad, I think I found where the Easter Bunny hides the other 364 days of the year!"
"Is this where Motortopia resides?"
Anybody of you other Motortopians go any ideas what this kid might be thinking?

Wide white walls

By alwaysakid

Filed under: /blogs/browse/t/vehicle/v//p

My '61 Thunderbird looks great with wide white walls. But alas, wide white walls apparently are not in the cards for my T-Bird, although I did put in a good effort.
I had purchased some fake wide-white walls for it a few years ago, but it turned out they were held on by wheel covers and my car has mag wheels, so that didn't work. Then I came across a guy who had a set of the original Portawalls from the 1950s or 1960s in excellent condition, and I bought them from him. But when I took them to the tire shop, we discovered the tire will not hold air with those Portawalls on them, so I had to purchase inner-tubes. I did that, but had to go to another store to get them. Then it was back to the tire shop, and the tire shop knocked down all the tires to install the tubes and then the Portawalls, but the guy warned me that he didn't know how well they'd hold up on modern tires because the modern tires are shaped a little different and don't have the smooth sidewalls with no raised letters or print like the tires of old. Sure enough, by the time I got it home, one of the Portawalls had worked part way off and broke. So, back to the tire shop, and I had him take them all off, because the car looked incomplete with only three wide white walls. When I got back home again, I discovered one of the tires going flat in the garage. So, I pulled that wheel off and went back to the tire shop again. It turned out the wheel had a slight defect in it that punctured the innertube but otherwise never would've manifested itself with tubeless tires. He took the innertube out and the tire was fine.
It was a most frustrating experience.
I'm aware that there are companies that sell wide white wall tires, but I've also head some stories of quality issues with these companies. I've been told the tires are made more for show than for doing a lot of driving. And having to order the tires by mail and having no dealer to go back to locally for repairs when something does go wrong makes me very hesitant to take this route. And that's without even mentioning the high cost of said tires.
But that's OK. The wide white walls may have looked great, but when you have a good-looking car to begin with, doing without them becomes a minor detail. That is, once I got over all the frustrations I dealt with.

That First Car

By alwaysakid

A lot of people treasure their first car. And some are lucky enough to still own it.
But not me. Don't get me wrong, the 1973 Datsun 610 hardtop coupe was a pretty cool car. It wasn't real fast, nor was the gas mileage all that great for a four cylinder vehicle (the '66 Nova I bought later did just as well with 6 cylinders). But it was a pretty good looking car -- at least until I T-boned a huge 1971 Thunderbird with it. Totaled them both out.
Now it's several years later, and I have no interest in seeking out another like it. I often read stories about people who do extensive searches to find a car like their first car, but I'm not even looking.
However, I did just recently come across a 1966 Nova for sale at a decent price, and in nice shape. I really liked that old Nova I once owned (the wife wrecked that one), and wouldn't mind getting another. And it's not often you see one at a reasonably low price. But that's because this Nova is a four-door. Mine was a hardtop. I like hardtops. So, I don't know if I really want to buy this one.
Maybe I should hold out until I come across a reasonably priced 1956 Ford Victoria. I loved my uncle's '56 Vicky, it was so cool. But it might have to be a four-door to be in my price range, too. I like hardtops.
Well, I'm not looking for a '73 Datsun 610 hardtop, though.
If only I could just learn to be satisfied with what I've got!

Know your Mopars?

By alwaysakid

Okay, you Motortopian Mopar fans, I need your help. I posted a photo album that has a couple Barracudas in it and I'm not sure what year they are. I took a guess at one, but I've been told it's wrong. Both are modified, adding to the challenge. They're in my May Cruise Activities album.
Can anyone help me out here?

I Got Pounded!

By alwaysakid

I hadn't had anyone challenge any of my cars in quite a while, and then suddenly I got several challenges in a short time. I was careless, and accepted the first two, not realizing it was the Pound looking for more victims.
I don't really mind losing a challenge, especially when it's just my daily driver. And the first challenge was a pretty cool pickup truck. I thought it would be interesting to see how people compared a quarter-mile racer against a long distance tourer. But we'll never know.
That's because I don't lobby my challenges. I go under the original spirit of the challenge to see how the general Motortopia populace views things. Unfortunately, there are a few groups out there that see challenges as an opportunity to gang up on those who do not belong to their groups. It's most unfortunate, because it gives the victor a very hollow victory. And they don't even try to hide it. You can see it in the challenge comments.
I don't have to mention who the groups are, there have been plenty of complaints about them before.
So, what do I want? Not a thing. I opened my garage door, and the pound swarmed in. It was more-or-less an invitation when I accepted the challenges.
But I have to admit, my interest in challenges of any kind has pretty much dwindled to nothing.

Road Trip

By alwaysakid

Filed under: /blogs/browse/t/vehicle/v//p

I just finished a trip to Spokane, WA and back in the Celica. I've always liked this car as I commute in it back and forth to work, but now I've found it's true purpose. It carries those letters "GT" on it for good reason.
When I got the car, I thought it would be a sporty, economical car. It is that, but it is more of a grand-touring automobile. I got 38 miles per gallon on much of the trip, and that's using 10-percent ethanol fuel. How can a car with such good acceleration get such good gas mileage?
But there's more. When I hit the Rocky Mountains, the fun really began. I've had some economical cars before, but they always lost speed going over the mountain passes. Not this one. I set the cruise-control on 80 MPH (for you law-enforcement people, I'm sure my speedometer reads higher than reality) and she never skipped a beat all the way up and over the mountain.
As other cars slowed for the curves and then struggled to regain their speed, I just zipped by, gripping the road effortlessly around any curve I-90 threw at us.
It was a blast!
Of course I did have to slow down when it snowed going over Bozeman Pass, and again for some snow squalls for a while, but for the most part it was nice cruising.
And then there are the seats. They don't look fancy. They're stock, Toyota issue. But I never got the back and neck aches I've gotten in so many other cars on long trips.
Usually we take the Mazda on long trips just because we can fit more stuff in it. But never again. I'll leave my clean underware behind if I have to, but the Celica is now THE car for travelling.
By the way, we saw some other cars on the trip that looked a lot cooler than My Celica. Check them out in the photo album in my garage. But I'm sure they all burned far more gas than me in each mile.

Ferrambo?

By alwaysakid

My son and his wife saw this car at a car show in Spokane recently and said it was made by combining a Rambler with a Ferrari. He said it was a Ridler Award winner and is called the Ferrambo, or something like that. The picture is not the best, as it was taken with a cell phone. Anybody know any more about this? It is rather interesting looking.

Snow Again!

By alwaysakid

Hey, how many more months until April gets here?
Yes, I've seen the calendar, but we keep getting snow. We got about 5 inches the last day of March and since yesterday we've accumulated about 3 inches of very wet snow. It's mostly slush on the roads, which actually is more slippery than snow when you drive on it. About 30 miles north of us, they got at least twice as much snow. And they're saying we're going to get more of the white stuff today and tonight!
Now, I like snow, it's very pretty. But as the Proverb says, "for everything there is a season," and spring is not the season for snow! It is supposed to be spring now, isn't it? I've seen robins in the yard. But of course, no flowers are budding because IT KEEPS SNOWING!!!
We need some warm weather around here. Al Gore better recalculate his statistics, because I think we might be coming into the next ice age, never mind "global warming"!
You think the price of gas is going up because of the war in the Middle East? Or maybe it's from greedy oil companies? Forget it -- it's supply and demand, and everybody in the upper Midwest is using up the supply TRYING TO STAY WARM!!!
We better get some warm weather before fall. There just seems like something wrong if the trees can't turn color because they NEVER GOT A CHANCE TO BUD ANY LEAVES!
And yes, that's the same picture I used with my last blog post (it's actually an older photo). And I'll keep on using it until spring finally gets here! I have no interest in going out and taking pictures in the snow at this time of year.

Where's spring?

By alwaysakid

Oh, no! It's snowing like the dickens, and we're supposed to get up to 8 inches today. How many more months until April gets here!?!

Out & runnin'!

By alwaysakid

Filed under: /blogs/browse/t/vehicle/v//p

I got the old Chevy out today, and it runs great, no worse the wear for sittin' all winter, although it did need the tranny fluid topped off. And that was $2 per gallon gas (I had bought it last fall) I was running on! Yee-ha!
I had replaced the alternator over the winter, as the car has a slight drain on the battery (needs recharging every 6-8 weeks), and the old alternator did test to be weak on the output charge. But the gauge still shows slightly negative when the motor is running, so I think something is till draining the battery, and I can't figure out what. The car's pretty simple electrically, so there isn't much to troubleshoot. I'm wondering if there's a short somewhere that I haven't found.
It's supposed to snow again tonight, so it may have to sit again until mother nature can bring some more rain to wash off the salt they'll probably thorw on the roads again.

cross interests

By alwaysakid

It's been a couple weeks since I posted a photo album featuring old cars and old trains. I never got any votes or comments on anything in it, which is interesting because I read a column in a Hemmings magazine once where a guy said a lot of automotive enthusiasts are also railroad buffs. It got me to wondering if that were true, so I posted that as a question in a forum in The American Auto Group. I got a a couple comments there, but not much. I'm thinking maybe that Hemmings columnist was wrong. But I thought I'd put this post out there and see if it generates any response before I write this one off. It's not that it's a big deal, but more of an "inquiring minds want to know" kind of thing. As for me? Yeah, I like trains, mostly old ones and especially steam locomotives. But I like cars more, especially old ones, and steam powered cars.
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