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Cars > Forums > Audio and Electronics > Custom Autosound

 

Forum: Audio and Electronics

  • Topic: Custom Autosound
  • Started by ReachDan Jun 15, 2007 at 10:32 am
  • Last post by custom_autosound Oct 17, 2011 at 6:44 pm
  • This topic has been viewed 6982 times and has 10 replies
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Topic: Custom Autosound

Forums > Audio and Electronics > Custom Autosound

Page 1 of 2: 1 2 > Last >> Posts 1 – 10 of 11  

  1. #1 Jun 15, 2007 at 10:32 am

    ReachDan’s Profile Photo
    ReachDan
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    Does anyone have any experience with Custom Autosound? Good, bad or indifferent, I'd like ot hear what you have to say.

    Custom Autosound looks like a cool way to go in my '66 Chevelle SS. I'm not looking to 'rock the world' but would like to have a system and Custum looks like a cool deal complete with CD Changer, iPod and MP3 plugins, wireless remote control...

    Thanx for your input...

    Dan & The Green Machine
     

     

    [img][/img]
  2. #2 Oct 9, 2007 at 9:07 am

    Toicontien’s Profile Photo
    Toicontien
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    I visited their web site and those radios look pretty good and they've got a ton of accessories. I looked online for reviews and couldn't find any. I've never had experience with this brand, but I'll have to keep it in mind. My mom is doing a minor resto of her '77 Malibu station wagon and I think she was looking for a radio face unit.
     

     

    Motortopian. Lover. Code Geek.
  3. #3 Oct 13, 2007 at 10:47 am

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    Specialk
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    I've seen a few installs of their radio's but have never personally heard them in action so I can't say they're great nor can I say they are crap.

    If your wanting to keep that classic look on your dash then by all means go with them for their -radio only-. As much as I don't want to bash a company it is a very reasonable asusmption to believe they are decades behind in speaker design. Companies such as Kicker, MTX, Hifonics, Polk, Audiobauhn, Eclipse, and many others have decades in the loudspeaker business and are huge companies with millions to throw around for R&D, meaning a better speaker for much less.

    As far as speakers go I'd wholly recommend if you can to spend the extra bones for Component speakers if your car supports multiple mounting locations. (Such as having two front speaker mounts.) Or if you willing to have someone make you car look not stock on the inside, place some kick panels. Being able to have two speakers clear across the car from each other makes a HUGE difference in the way a car's audio system sounds. The component systems are two seperate speakers in and of themselves, a large speaker (Between 5 1/4" to 7" or even 4x10 - 6x9 if you get lucky) and a small tweeter between a half and whole inch. The small speaker will handle all the highest frequencies since it is small and can resonate quickly very easy providing accurate vocals and cymbal crashes and other high frequency sound. Mean while the larger speakers will handle riffs from a gituar, the deep vocals of a tenor, and snare licks. They "can" also handle the really deep frequencies, but if you ask me frequencies below 125Hz are best handled by subwoofers.

    Yes subwoofers. Don't get all "I dont' listen to that get dang hiphop" on me. A subwoofer (or two) is a great addition to complete the package. For you application I'd suggest a stout 8" or 10" woofer, maybe two. A 8" you can hide easily in a stealth enclosure and will not shake your insides when you wanna turn up the volume, but you wont' have any of your speakers distorting because your giving each of them a specific job to work the frequencies they can easily handle.

    Finally, probably the most expensive single part you will buy. Is a external amplifier. You'll buy this and match your speakers RMS to the amplifiers RMS not peak RMS (Root Mean Square) is the peak continuous power that the amp can provide, usually about half of its' total peak with maximum distortion. It's ok to buy an amp too big for the speakers. Because that'll just mean they're getting clean power beyond what they can handle constantly, but buying to small an amp will cause clipping, and that is actually what destroys 75% of the speakers in cars today.

    Anyway I'm sure this is a lot to take in. So here's come cliffs.

    Buy the deck, buy nice speakers from a reputable company that's been in the biz for a few years, get components if you want maximum sound quality (not loudness) mount them in the four corners of your car if you can, buy an amp to power the speakers. And maybe, get a small subwoofer.

    http://www.do...hp?topic=17.0

    Thats' my car, I have a serious sound system in it, I don't really need the subs but its' nice to get those damn ricers to turn down that bull**** they call music. By making their knock sensor stall their little econobox form the bass hits of iron man. thumbsup image
     

     

  4. #4 Oct 17, 2007 at 3:22 pm

    Toicontien’s Profile Photo
    Toicontien
    Total posts: 134
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    You might be able to go with a head unit from that company, and then buy speakers from another company and have them mounted in the same positions as the stock speakers. You don't necessarily have to cut holes in the car and put in new speaker mounts. Try calling around to a few car audio places and asking them about stock replacement speakers, and a little about what you want to accomplish (keeping the car looking stock but radio sounding great).
     

     

    Motortopian. Lover. Code Geek.
  5. #5 May 6, 2008 at 9:46 am

    classiccarguy’s Profile Photo
    classiccarguy
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    I bought a Custom Autosound radio from vintagecarradio.com. They were very helpful and the radio worked great. I will definitely go back for anything else I need.
     

     

  6. #6 May 8, 2008 at 1:18 pm

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    joe_wicked
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    Quote:
    Originally posted by Specialk  Finally, probably the most expensive single part you will buy. Is a external amplifier. You'll buy this and match your speakers RMS to the amplifiers RMS not peak RMS (Root Mean Square) is the peak continuous power that the amp can provide, usually about half of its' total peak with maximum distortion. It's ok to buy an amp too big for the speakers. Because that'll just mean they're getting clean power beyond what they can handle constantly, but buying to small an amp will cause clipping, and that is actually what destroys 75% of the speakers in cars today.

    Very good write up, matching the RMS is the most important part of a good sounding system. You are correct on the clipping from the amp not being able to put out what the speaker is needing to sound properly, but having an amp that puts out over the speakers RMS wattage is also not good. Having an amp that is a little over the RMS wattage of the speaker will not cause a problem, just like having one just a little under will not, but having an amp that is more than just a little over the RMS wattage will cause just as much strain on the speaker. I have seen more than 1 case of the cone completely separating from the voice coil from over power. In systems that I design, I try my best to make sure that the RMS wattage on the speaker and amp are the same or at least within 10% (200 watt not more than 20 watts difference). For higher end systems, I tighten that up. I have had audio "experts" not believe me that in my Mustang I have 1 single voice coil 12 (JL Audio 12w0). It hits harder than my neighbors 15 and it is 8 years old. My amp is an Xtant 202M internally bridged (200 Watts RMS @4 ohm. The sub is 200 watts RMS @4 ohm) This is ideal, after 8 years, there is no distortion and no fatigue.
     

     

  7. #7 Aug 27, 2008 at 8:58 am

    MEANlowGREEN’s Profile Photo
    MEANlowGREEN
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    If you want a really good sound system do not use their in dash units. If all you care about is factory fit they are fine. Their in dash units that are made to fit without cutting the dash are inferior to most any aftermarket stereo except for Roadmaster or Boss or similar flea market brands but yet they cost as much as a high end stereo head unit. Their Secret Audio line is a much better product. These are the ones that mount under a seat or somewhere out of site and controlled by a thin faceplate surface mounted on the dash or controlled by the remote.
     

     

    Amazingly I'm still single! eek image)
  8. #8 Nov 21, 2008 at 6:16 am

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    tripster
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    i installed my system in my glove box with a romote works great its hidden and the am radio still in dash
     

     

    tripster
  9. #9 Sep 29, 2010 at 12:56 am

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    khale
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    My dad installed a sound system together with a radio control switch something needed to easily turn on/off the radio. biggrin image
     

     

    Edited Oct 1, 2010 at 8:45 pm

  10. #10 Jul 13, 2011 at 8:46 am

    Balboa777’s Profile Photo
    Balboa777
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    i just installed a new jvc stereo and 16 inch subwoofer in my 80 firebird, looks and sounds great! baught both from Sumit Racing, and they were here the next day! they've got my bisness.
     

     

    2001 Dodge Durango
    1980 Pontiac Firebird
    1977 Chevrolet Custom Deluxe 20
    1962 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova

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