Motortopia: Where your passion parks

Motortopia: Where your passion parks.

Why Join Motortopia? So you can keep up with events... RSVP! Post Event Photos! Submit Events!

  1. cars
  2. bikes
  3. boats
  4. planes

Cars > Groups > United States Muscle Car Federation > Forums > Technical Q&A > Roller question

 

Forum: Technical Q&A

  • Topic: Roller question
  • Started by LrngCrv Feb 21, 2007 at 9:06 pm
  • Last post by FordFanboi May 30, 2007 at 9:13 am
  • This topic has been viewed 515 times and has 11 replies
more search options
 

Topic: Roller question

Forums > Technical Q&A > Roller question

Page 1 of 2: 1 2 > Last >> Posts 1 – 10 of 13  

  1. #1 Feb 21, 2007 at 9:06 pm

    LrngCrv’s Profile Photo
    LrngCrv
    Total posts: 82
    Send Message
    What do you guys think for a 50/50 street/strip car:

    Hydraulic Roller or Mechanic Roller?

    Ideas, reasons?
     

     

    Current Rides
    '99 Pontiac Firebird TransAm
    '63 Ford Galaxie


    Recently Passed Cars
    '92 Camaro RS
    '91 Camaro RS
    '86 Toyota TT Supra
  2. #2 Feb 21, 2007 at 11:01 pm

    tward6’s Profile Photo
    tward6
    Total posts: 85
    Send Message
    Here's your answer

    The advantage of the mechanical roller is that the valve can be opened at a quicker rate, giving you more "area under the curve", or, more effective duration for the same advertised duration. More area under the curve means more air, or potentially better cylinder fill, thus more power. The ramp rate is limited on hydraulics by the "hydraulic intensity" of the lifter. In other words, if you try to move the lifter too quickly, the plunger could collapse or sink during the opening of the valve.

    The disadvantage to the mechnical roller is that higher spring rates are required because of the faster lifter/valve action. The higher spring rates are harder on the rest of the valve train, especially the lifters and valve stems and guides. Racing cams are not recommended for the street because of the longer times street engines spend idling or running at low speeds. This is hard on the roller lifter because the roller will overheat because of the high spring pressure. At higher engine speeds there is more oil splashed on the cam and lifters which helps cool the roller. Lifter manufacturers have begun doing things like putting grooves in the lifter body to channel oil to the roller to cool it (cool being a relative term here).

    There are mechanical rollers designed for street use though that still have the advantage of faster ramp rates over hydraulics (but not as fast a ramp rate as a racing lobe), and therefore don't require as much spring pressure as a racing cam.
     

     

    Ladies prefer the gentleman who owns a bowtie especially if its a Camaro


    1981 Camaro Z28 - Zed the Canadian Wonder Car eh!
    1983 Camaro Z28 - 6,890 miles original unrestored

    Edited Feb 21, 2007 at 11:03 pm

  3. #3 Feb 21, 2007 at 11:04 pm

    tward6’s Profile Photo
    tward6
    Total posts: 85
    Send Message
    The nod for durability and reliability has to go to the hydraulic roller because the lighter spring pressure is easier on parts, and especially so if it's a factory roller block because the retro-fit roller hyd. lifters (and all mechanical rollers) use a tie bar to keep them in alignment, and those things have been know to break - it's another moving part. You can make very good power with the hydraulic roller. And, they're zero maintenance, which is attractive.

    If your a cruiser, stay away from roller camshafts. If your a racer and know what your doing, put it in.
     

     

    Ladies prefer the gentleman who owns a bowtie especially if its a Camaro


    1981 Camaro Z28 - Zed the Canadian Wonder Car eh!
    1983 Camaro Z28 - 6,890 miles original unrestored

    Edited Feb 21, 2007 at 11:07 pm

  4. #4 Feb 22, 2007 at 12:49 am

    LrngCrv’s Profile Photo
    LrngCrv
    Total posts: 82
    Send Message
    So how about this, a 350 w/ a super beefy cam w/ long duration and high lift, going to a 408 stroke and a huge TB/intake, should I also lower the size of my cam? Maybe keep the same duration but lower the ramp rate? It wouldn't need to be as high with all that airflow right? Would it be better to change to something a little smaller?
     

     

    Current Rides
    '99 Pontiac Firebird TransAm
    '63 Ford Galaxie


    Recently Passed Cars
    '92 Camaro RS
    '91 Camaro RS
    '86 Toyota TT Supra
  5. #5 Feb 22, 2007 at 10:54 pm

    LrngCrv’s Profile Photo
    LrngCrv
    Total posts: 82
    Send Message
    Wow, that post was very generalized... maybe I shouldn't do any drunken posting anymore...
     

     

    Current Rides
    '99 Pontiac Firebird TransAm
    '63 Ford Galaxie


    Recently Passed Cars
    '92 Camaro RS
    '91 Camaro RS
    '86 Toyota TT Supra
  6. #6 Feb 22, 2007 at 11:46 pm

    tward6’s Profile Photo
    tward6
    Total posts: 85
    Send Message
    Quote:
    Originally posted by LrngCrv  So how about this, a 350 w/ a super beefy cam w/ long duration and high lift, going to a 408 stroke and a huge TB/intake, should I also lower the size of my cam? I wouldn't see why you would have to but I guess you could Maybe keep the same duration but lower the ramp rate?Sounds Logical It wouldn't need to be as high with all that airflow right? Right Would it be better to change to something a little smaller? It's really hard to say for sure it may just take some trial and error to get it right
     

     

    Ladies prefer the gentleman who owns a bowtie especially if its a Camaro


    1981 Camaro Z28 - Zed the Canadian Wonder Car eh!
    1983 Camaro Z28 - 6,890 miles original unrestored

    Edited Feb 22, 2007 at 11:49 pm

  7. #7 Feb 22, 2007 at 11:52 pm

    LrngCrv’s Profile Photo
    LrngCrv
    Total posts: 82
    Send Message
    I'm actually in the process of working to get a stroker setup for my LS1... it's such a headache because I'm no expert by any means (just an enthusiast) and trying to decide on everything I went is pretty stressful and forcing me to do a lot of looking around...

    it will be worth it in the end though!
    (thx for the replies!)
     

     

    Current Rides
    '99 Pontiac Firebird TransAm
    '63 Ford Galaxie


    Recently Passed Cars
    '92 Camaro RS
    '91 Camaro RS
    '86 Toyota TT Supra
  8. #8 Feb 23, 2007 at 12:02 am

    tward6’s Profile Photo
    tward6
    Total posts: 85
    Send Message
    Sounds fun the LS1 is a good engine. Replies are no problem that's why we are here.
     

     

    Ladies prefer the gentleman who owns a bowtie especially if its a Camaro


    1981 Camaro Z28 - Zed the Canadian Wonder Car eh!
    1983 Camaro Z28 - 6,890 miles original unrestored
  9. #9 Mar 20, 2007 at 2:27 pm

    mannysc’s Profile Photo
    mannysc
    Total posts: 5
    Send Message
    I currently run a hyd roller cam in my supercoupe you can get some good profiles but as stated the hydro cams can go that radical but for me its all good im running a supercharged engine my little 3.8 ford 5spd its does ok for a v6 mostly stock I run high 13s,

    with all the parts I make id estimate much faster,

    some of my counterparts go 10s lots of 11s with these hydro cams bur we are all supercharged our specs differ from N/A engines
     

     

    mannysc@msn.com

    community.webshots.com/user/mannysc
  10. #10 May 19, 2007 at 10:58 pm

    BRS’s Profile Photo
    BRS
    Total posts: 60
    Send Message
    Check into Rhoads variable duration lifters. They act like a hydraulic lifter at idle but a solid lifter at higher RMP. They work great on a high lift long duration cam that your running on the street. It makes the engine very drivable.
     

     

    Yesterday is gone and tomorrow ain't here yet!

    Edited May 19, 2007 at 10:59 pm

Page 1 of 2: 1 2 > Last >> Posts 1 – 10 of 13  

login to reply  

Forums > Technical Q&A > Roller question

Download Drive Magazine Now!

Advertisements

    Special Offers & Deals

Advertisement

 

Cars > Groups > United States Muscle Car Federation > Forums > Technical Q&A > Roller question

Print your passion at Motortopia.com (http://www.motortopia.com)