Let’s visit the Brother’s Truck Show

For those who may not know, Brother’s Trucks retails replacement and custom parts for 1947-87 GM trucks. So these guys know trucks, and are absolutely passionate about them. That explains why 18 years ago they decided to throw their own event where everyone could show off their well-loved, old-school GM rides.

The event was held over the summer at Canyon RV Park in Anaheim, California. In the past, only a couple hundred vehicles made it to the park, but this time they had 520 vehicles in attendance! With the recent bump in the popularity of C-10s, many top builders now make it a point to attend the show. And now that people know they can come out to see some of their favorite classic GM trucks all in one place, the show is flourishing. A ton of truck fans were able to enjoy a variety of different vehicles.

Cannonball C-10

Michael Maysmith brought his Cannonball C-10 all the way down from San Jose, CA, and it caught many people’s attention.

With the exception of body and paint, Ernie Mello built this ’51 Chevy in his garage with help from friends.

Our sister pub’s ’62 GMC project truck debuted door art from Chadcan’tcolor.

Though C-10s were the most popular vehicle to bring to the show, plenty of other GM trucks joined the party. An abundance of Advance Design and Task Force trucks gleamed in the SoCal sun. The trucks came in all different forms, from airbagged to sky-high lifted versions. Styles ranged from patina to shaved, chopped and painted.

Mark this one on your calendar; it’s one of our personal favorites. And get there early to beat the crowd.

Though the original paint was worn down on Josh Criswell’s ’70 C-10, it was tucking a set of 22×9 and 24×15 Intro wheels with a mirror-like polish.

Here’s 2016’s Best-of-Show-winning truck, a ’67 C-10 owned by Howard Stubbins.

Dustin Deleon and the crew from Hot Rods by Dustin drove out from Dallas in this rare extended
cab square-body C-10.

For more info on the show or any parts from Brother’s, visit Brotherstrucks.com.


Editor’s Note: A version of this article first appeared in the January 2017 print issue of the Drive Magazine.